True Life: I am a Social Media Manager

It's that time of the year when everyone is on vacation, so we decided to give our blog writers a much deserved time off and repost one of our top performing blogs of the year. We hope you'll enjoy it, and have a great rest of the summer!

For whatever reason, it seems as if the most commonly asked question when meeting someone for the first time is, “What do you do?” I usually respond, “Well, I am a Social Media Manager (SMM).” This is usually followed by the person responding with, “Oh! You get paid to sit on Facebook and Twitter all day?” Sound the record scratch! While this is partly true, marketers and numerous brands/companies know that this is just scratching the surface. While social media is an ever-evolving industry, it is obviously so much more than just “posting to Facebook and Twitter.” In any given day, I wear many different hats.

In a typical day, I converse with clients and coworkers, create engaging and valuable content, analyze analytics of ad campaigns and content, research and plan future posts and campaigns, and monitor the different networks for engagement and mentions on behalf of my clients.

I recognize that the social media world is confusing for business owners to navigate when they have been focused on their trade for much of their career. Social media for businesses came quick and has turned into a whirlwind of an industry. The thing that some business owners may not understand is that being an SMM is a real, full time position that goes far beyond posting current specials and commenting when someone likes their status.

Creating and analyzing ad campaigns are two of the largest responsibilities for a SMM in more ways than one. Building campaigns properly to get traffic, engagement, and to hit goals, is crucial. My clients have entrusted me with their money and expect that I will use my industry knowledge to gain them results. Once the ad is created, I’m not on coast-mode. I optimize throughout the month to make sure it’s delivering, and if it is not, I tweak it.

I review this information and create content with the goal of resonating with the type of people that are responding to the different posts and ads. My clients provide me with photos and specials they have going on to align with their advertising goals. I also keep an eye on local events that may attract people to the area because my clients are in the hospitality industry.

When I’m not focusing on ads or creating content, I’m monitoring the different social profiles that I manage. I engage with the followers and answer any questions that get directed to the brands. This is one of my favorite parts of my job. It is exciting to see when my content has been a success and the positive feedback that my clients receive. It is also beneficial for me to see when content doesn’t generate any form of engagement. This lets me know I need to try something else in the future.

All in all, I am in a field that is constantly evolving and requires a lot of detail, research, and thought. I consider myself to be a part of the small percentage of people who are paid to do something they are truly passionate about. Like everything else, it is not always rainbows and lollipops. There is responsibility and even liability of speaking on behalf of a brand. I look forward to this challenge, amount of responsibility, and sense of purpose I am embarking on as a newly hired Social Media Manager at Thin Pig Media.

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The Facebook Pixel: What You Need to Know

Unhappy with your Facebook Ads results? Not exactly sure how Facebook Ads work, but by now, you think you probably have made some sales from them? With the Facebook pixel, you can take the guesswork out. You can also access analytics galore (more than print, radio, and television, by the way) that can help you target the right customers in order to reach your ad goals.

What Is It?

In simplest terms, the Facebook pixel is a tool that allows advertisers to measure effectiveness and track conversions from Facebook ads, automatically optimize ads, and create retargeted ads.

Track Conversions

Yes, the Facebook pixel actually allows you to see if you’ve made any sales based on a Facebook ad click. Not only this, but your campaign will tell you how many sales occurred, when they happened, and in many cases, the amount that was spent and how much each conversion cost you in terms of ad spend. What's more, you can dive in deeper and see which gender made the purchase, which day of the week it was made on, and more! Facebook will also set you up with ways to target the right people in order to help you reach your conversion goal, or “event.”

In addition to purchase/reservation transactions, advertisers can track a number of website events, which include:

  • Purchase

  • Lead

  • Complete Registration

  • Add Payment Info

  • Initiate Checkout

  • Add to Cart

  • Add to Wishlist

  • Search

  • View Content

  • Custom conversions

If your business is hoping to track any of these events, then the Facebook Pixel is a must.

How It Works

Facebook will provide you with a code specific to your ad account that you will then place on the backend of your website code. Trust us, it’s not as scary as it sounds. You then activate it on Facebook and voilà -- your pixel is tracking.

Optimize Audience

As mentioned before, once the pixel reaches a conversion threshold (e.g. Purchase, Registration Complete, Add to Cart, etc.), Facebook will start optimizing your ads in order to show them to people who are more likely to convert based on your goals. A lookalike audience can be created from this data, which essentially is an audience that Facebook believes is similar in demographics & interests to the people who have visited your website.

Retargeting

Have you ever shopped for shoes online, left the store’s website without purchasing, only to find that those shoes are following you around Facebook? That’s remarketing (aka retargeting). With the pixel, you can retarget visitors who have been on your website, back on Facebook. You can choose to retarget everyone who visits your website, just those taking a specific action, or those visiting specific pages of your website.

So while we’ve just covered the basics of the Facebook pixel here, there is no doubt that this little tool is packed with power. It can take a lot of the unknowns out of how well your Facebook ads are performing, and if your business is making any conversions from advertising. If you need assistance or just have questions about the Facebook pixel, don’t hesitate to contact us today. We can help set your website up with the Facebook pixel, run Facebook Advertising for your business, or simply just answer a question you may have about the pixel.

Boomerang: 1-Second Video Loops Everyone Loves

What is Boomerang?

Boomerang is an Instagram app that allows you to create mini videos that continually loop back and forth (much like the toy “boomerang” itself.) The app essentially takes a quick burst of photographs and combines them together to make a soundless, 1-second video. It’s a fun and unique way to add something a little “extra” to your videos.

Why it’s great:

One word: simplicity. Anyone who’s used Boomerang before will tell you that it’s one of the simplest apps to use! Once the app is open, you only have to hold down one button to capture your mini video. The content of the video doesn’t need to be complex either, as you only have a brief moment to capture the subject in action.

Boomerang for your business:

Businesses can take advantage of Boomerang to showcase their products, services, and culture in a unique way. Users are more likely to engage with, and remember a Boomerang post more than they will a normal video. This is due to the quick succession and aesthetically pleasing way in which information is relayed.

For example, IKEA used a Boomerang to announce its new bicycle:

Vans captured its “free spirit” vibe with this Boomerang:

@leilahurst cutting loose like it's Friday. 📸 @jatecson #Regram from @vanssurf

A post shared by vans (@vans) on

Ulta Beauty frequently uses Boomerang to show off new product releases and makeup tutorials:

#Repost @lovemelisamichelle

A post shared by Ulta Beauty (@ultabeauty) on

Jus by Julie loves to promote a healthy lifestyle by featuring its employees eating its product:

Using the Boomerang app is simple, effective and engaging. With a video length so short, the possibilities of content are endless. Let your creative juices flow and spice up your Instagram posts with these mini videos.

The Composition of a Brand

The Composition of a Brand

Over the last century, the word brand has floated around with a wide variety of meanings, depending on the time period. Since the word’s meaning has changed and has become increasingly more nuanced, many don’t know what the true meaning of brand is today. While not knowing the exact meaning of branding won’t stop a business from being successful, it can make it difficult to progress.

Originally, brands were used to prove ownership of livestock. You know, the act of branding an animal? As graphic design and marketing became more prevalent, branding was similar to the original brand mark made on livestock. It usually consisted of the company’s name written out and that was about it. Advertisers would sneak company names and the occasional logo into posters and product packaging, which made brand recognition largely based on customers' ability to recognize the brand’s name despite the typography not always being consistent. Later, typography became more consistent, making it easier for companies to be recognized by their customers. This eventually lead to what we think of as logos today. As logos became more prevalent, more shapes and pictographic elements were included in the logo, allowing for more elements to be interpreted from the logo itself.

When people think of brands they often think of a logo, and in the past this would be a true interpretation. Nowadays a brand is so much more than just a logo. The logo used to be the pinnacle of a brand, the most important piece, the part that the customers interacted with most. But by today’s brand standards, logos, while still important, have adapted to become a piece within a set of important parts of a brand. It is the sum of all these parts that create a brand, not any one individual piece. You can be a successful new company without even having a logo, so what are the parts that make a brand today?

A brand is everything with which a customer interacts. From the way that your employee picks up the phone -- to the corporations' email signatures -- everything presented to someone outside your company is a part of your brand. A company’s brand is what dictates how those interactions proceed. They describe which tone of voice to use in the content on your website and in marketing, as well as your phone calls and emails. The brand tells designers what colors and typefaces to use, and it tells marketers what types of photos to post on social media.

A brand is the sum of all its parts, and each is equally as important as the other. When endeavoring to create a brand or when re-branding, having only a logo isn’t enough. Here is a list of some of the important pieces of a brand:

Finding your brand voice, story, and message, and tying it all together can be difficult. If getting all the facets right seems overwhelming, seeking professional help may be a better way to go. With each tweet, post, and hashtag there are many opportunities to be “on brand” -- and many ways to get it wrong. Thin Pig Media has years of expertise in branding and marketing and luckily we are only a phone call away.